Articles Tagged with American Realty Capital Properties

A $60M settlement has been reached between The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and AR Capital, the real estate investment trust (REIT) manager’s founder Nicholas Schorsch, and American Realty Capital Properties Inc. (ARCP) ex-CFO Brian Block. The three of them are accused of “wrongfully obtaining” millions of dollars related to two mergers involving REITS that AR Capital managed and sponsored.

According to the regulator’s complaint, between the latter part of 2012 and the beginning of 2014, AR Capital took steps so that ARCP, a publicly traded REIT, would merge with American Realty Capital Trust III and American Realty Capital Trust IV, two non-traded REITS that were publicly held. Schorsch was the principal owner and CEO of all three REITs during the time of the merger, while Block was the CFO and a minority shareholder.

The Commission contends that without their board’s permission, the REIT manager, Schorsch, and Block “inflated an incentive fee” during the mergers, which made it possible for them to get another $2.92M in ARCP operating partnership units as a portion of their “incentive-based” compensation.” The SEC is also accusing the three defendants of “wrongfully obtaining” at least $7.2M in charges that were not supported from the sale and asset purchase agreements that were related to the mergers.

The New York City Retirement Systems and TIAA-CREF have joined other institutional investors in suing American Realty Capital Properties (ARCP). They contend that the real estate investment trust violated federal securities laws when it allegedly made misleading and false statements that misrepresented the company’s business, as well as took part in a scam to fool the market and artificially inflate American Realty securities prices.

The securities laws claims are related to a $23 million accounting error that REIT made during last year’s first stated quarters, misstating the company’s adjusted operation funds. While ARCP eventually disclosed the mistakes, the plaintiffs claim that the company’s senior executives did not at first correct the error when it was discovered. The institutional investors believe that this was because executives wanted to get class members to buy American Realty securities at inflated prices.

TIAA-CREF and the $158.7 billion pension fund are seeking lead plaintiff class action securities status for their institutional investor fraud lawsuit.

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