Articles Posted in Industry Bars

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority has barred three more former brokers in the wake of fraud allegations against them. Two of them were based in Texas. They are:

For the third time this month, The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority  has announced that it has barred yet another Morgan Stanley (MS) broker. The brokerage firm had fired financial adviser Bruce Plyer in late 2016 in the wake of allegations that he executed trades in a client’s account without authorization. Now, the self-regulatory organization is barring Plyer after he failed to appear and give testimony into FINRA’s probe into the matter.

Plyer has accepted and consented to FINRA’s findings, but he is not admitting to or denying any of them.

After being let go from Morgan Stanley, he was registered for a short time with International Assets Advisory until he left the industry early last year.

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority has barred another former Morgan Stanley (MS) broker. John Halsey Buck III consented to the industry bar after he did not provide the information and documents that the self-regulatory organization asked for related to its probe into his alleged involvement in unapproved private securities sales. Buck, who has over 50 years experience in the industry, was let go by the brokerage firm earlier this year.

Morgan Stanley reportedly fired him in the wake of disclosure-related issues, including those involving private investments that did not involve the broker-dealer. According to InvestmentNews, the allegations against Buck have to do with “selling away.” This is a practice that happens when a stockbroker, financial adviser, or a registered representative solicits the sale of or sells securities that his or her brokerage firm does not offer or hold. Broker-dealers usually have a list of approved products that its brokers are allowed to sell to firm clients.

Buck had been with the industry since 1965. Previous to working with Morgan Stanley, he was a registered broker with UBS Financial Services (UBS), Wachovia Securities, Prudential Securities Incorporated, Loeb Partners, and Hornblower, Weeks, Noyes & Trask.

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority announced this week that it is barring three former brokers. They are ex-Morgan Stanley broker (MS) Kevin Smith and former Wells Fargo (WFC) brokers Wilfred Rodriquez Jr. and Thomas A. Davis.

According to the self-regulatory authority’s order, the bar against Smith comes after he wouldn’t appear before FINRA to testify regarding allegations involving a structured products trade in a family member’s trust that he may have executed without checking with the client first.

Morgan Stanley fired Smith in 2016 in the wake of the broker fraud allegations.

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) has barred Wells Fargo (WFC) broker Edward O. Daniel, after he failed to participate in a probe into allegations that he made unsuitable investments for one client. Daniel, a Texas-based broker, was with Wells Fargo Advisers for seven years before he stepped down in September 2016. He was a longtime broker of 41 years.

Soon after Daniel resignation two years ago, Wells Fargo disclosed that a customer had filed an arbitration complaint accusing him of making unsuitable investments over a several-year period. The dispute was resolved for $225K. His BrokerCheck record documents that Daniel has been named in eight disclosures, all involving complaints by customers.

Now, FINRA is barring him because he would not cooperate in the self-regulatory authority’s investigation into the unsuitable investment allegations.

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) has barred three former brokers who failed to take part in the self-regulatory authority’s probe into allegations of wrongdoing. Stephen T. Hurtak, formerly of Stifel Nicolaus & Co., was a broker for 39 years. According to FINRA, Hurtak refused to take part in the investigation into possibly unsuitable recommendations he may have made to several customers.

Unsuitable Recommendations

Brokers have a duty to make investment recommendations and strategies that are appropriate for a customer as it pertains to their investment goals, risk tolerance, and portfolios. When unsuitable recommendations lead to investment losses, this can be grounds for an investor fraud case.

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